• IUCN World Conservation Congress

The Center Helps Set Global Conservation Agenda at IUCN Congress

September 16th, 2021|Comments Off on The Center Helps Set Global Conservation Agenda at IUCN Congress

Every four years, thousands of representatives from government, civil society, Indigenous peoples, business, and academia come together at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) World Conservation Congress with the goal of setting conservation priorities and driving actions. In light of challenges to convening, the postponed 2020 Congress was held with both in-person and virtual participants from September 3 to 11, 2021, in Marseille, France. As an official non-governmental organization (NGO) Member of the Union, the Center for Large Landscape Conservation contributed in multiple ways at the Congress toward setting the international conservation agenda for the coming decade.

2021 Catalyst Fund Grant Awards

August 20th, 2021|Comments Off on 2021 Catalyst Fund Grant Awards

The Network for Landscape Conservation has announced its 2021 Catalyst Fund grant awards, with 15 Landscape Conservation Partnerships from throughout the United States receiving support. Funds will be used to advance Partnerships’ efforts to protect the ecological, cultural, and community values of the landscapes they call home. Grants are made to Partnerships demonstrating a genuinely collaborative approach to conservation, involving a variety of stakeholders and often including historically marginalized communities who have been excluded from previous land-management decisions. In particular, a portion of the Fund is specifically dedicated to supporting Indigenous leadership in landscape conservation.

‘Rules of Thumb’ for Marine Connectivity Conservation Released Today

August 10th, 2021|Comments Off on ‘Rules of Thumb’ for Marine Connectivity Conservation Released Today

The ecological connectivity of marine and coastal ecosystems is essential. It requires linkages that connect our oceans' critical habitats, species, and natural processes. These connections allow a variety of species to move and they also sustain important ecosystem functions such as fish larvae dispersal, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestration—the ocean's ability to capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to slow climate change. To inform conservation efforts that maintain, enhance, and restore ecological connectivity of the oceans, a new publication was released today titled "Marine Connectivity Conservation ‘Rules of Thumb’ for MPA and MPA Network Design."

Career Opportunity: Chief Operating Officer

July 29th, 2021|0 Comments

The Center for Large Landscape Conservation is looking for a new team member to fill the position of Chief Operating Officer (COO). The Center is growing, and we are seeking an experienced COO to oversee the organization’s business operations to ensure we are positioned for continued growth and effective delivery of our conservation mission.

  • Bull Elk

Citizen Scientists Collect Wildlife Data with Smartphone App

July 15th, 2021|Comments Off on Citizen Scientists Collect Wildlife Data with Smartphone App

Roads can have many negative impacts on our natural world. Road ecologists study both the effects of roads on wildlife—such as roadkill and habitat fragmentation—and how to reduce these impacts. However, road ecologists can’t identify problem areas or develop solutions without a strong baseline of information on where and when animals attempt to cross roads or are struck by vehicles. Fortunately, new technology has created an opportunity for the public to help collect this data, and the Center is making this tool widely available.

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