Diving In: The Center Helps Advance Marine Connectivity

When we hear the term “ecological corridors” we tend to think of the natural pathways that land animals like elk or elephants use to move among larger natural areas to eat, drink, mate and meet other survival needs. Corridors are equally important for marine life like whales, turtles, fish, and seabirds, which depend on linkages between ocean areas for daily movement, seasonal migration, and completing their life cycles. Until recently, collaborative research and guidance on marine ecological connectivity had been lacking, but now the Center for Large Landscape Conservation is supporting coordination of work by a unique group of experts that is making the issue a top priority.

By |2022-01-31T16:42:02-07:00January 28th, 2022|International Connectivity, Mentorship, Networking, Networks We Host, Science|Comments Off on Diving In: The Center Helps Advance Marine Connectivity

New Infrastructure Funding Unites Transportation and Wildlife Experts

The opinion piece below, authored by two Center for Large Landscape Conservation staff members, originally appeared on Smerconish.com on November 24, 2021. Since then, the Center has created a “toolkit” to help interested applicants and their partners understand the Wildlife Crossings Pilot Program criteria and design projects that will make the most of this new federal funding.

By |2022-01-10T09:30:10-07:00January 10th, 2022|Corridors and Crossings, Policy|Comments Off on New Infrastructure Funding Unites Transportation and Wildlife Experts
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