• Asian Elephant in Road

Protecting Asian Elephant Movement in 13 Countries

July 14th, 2021|Comments Off on Protecting Asian Elephant Movement in 13 Countries

It is estimated that fewer than 52,000 Asian elephants remain in the wild. Currently listed as “endangered” on the IUCN Red List, Asian elephants thrive when they have the freedom to follow their traditional movement routes to access food, water, and mates. However, herds across South and Southeast Asia are declining due to habitat loss and fragmentation, which prevent them from meeting their life cycle needs. In response, the Center is supporting the work of infrastructure ecologists and elephant biologists to help maintain the ability of elephants to move across landscapes.

Tribes Take the Lead in Climate Change Planning

July 13th, 2021|Comments Off on Tribes Take the Lead in Climate Change Planning

The Little Rocky Mountains in Montana form an island range in a sea of prairie. As a result of their isolation, they are home to plant and wildlife species that are not found anywhere nearby, leaving them especially vulnerable to climate change impacts. In the shadow of the Little Rockies, the Aaniiih and Nakoda peoples of the Fort Belknap Indian Community are taking a bold stand to protect this mountain ecosystem to help preserve their traditional ways of life. The Center is supporting this effort by assisting them in restoring forest health and planning for a rapidly changing climate.

Partnership Spotlight: The Salazar Center

July 10th, 2021|Comments Off on Partnership Spotlight: The Salazar Center

We are pleased to feature one of our valued partners: The Salazar Center for North American Conservation, founded in 2018 at Colorado State University. The Salazar Center supports and advances the health and connectivity of the natural systems and human communities of North America. Their intersectional approach builds bridges that connect academic research, community practice, and policy development, with a focus on both large landscapes and urban environments.

  • Wildlife overpass

Landmark Legislation to Protect Wildlife Corridors Passes U.S. House of Representatives

July 2nd, 2021|Comments Off on Landmark Legislation to Protect Wildlife Corridors Passes U.S. House of Representatives

Marking a significant step for wildlife conservation, the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act along with $400 million for projects to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions, passed the United States House of Representatives as part of H.R. 3684, the INVEST in America Act. These important provisions will safeguard biodiversity while helping stimulate the U.S. economy, mitigate climate impacts, and reduce highway fatalities.

Colorado Joins Wave of States Protecting Wildlife Corridors

June 30th, 2021|Comments Off on Colorado Joins Wave of States Protecting Wildlife Corridors

Colorado residents and millions of annual visitors alike enjoy the state’s dramatic landscapes, abundant recreation opportunities, and iconic wildlife. So it’s not surprising that Colorado recently became the latest state to pass legislation to safeguard habitat connectivity and wildlife corridors, which are essential for healthy ecosystems. Protecting the ability of wildlife to move freely across the landscape is a win-win-win: it allows animals to meet their needs, enhances driver safety, and supports recreation opportunities for hunters, anglers, and wildlife viewers.

Navigation