About centerforlargelandscapes

Conserving Life on Earth by Reconnecting Our Natural World

The Center’s Kylie Paul Wins Emerging Conservationist Award

A Montana group that has been recognizing conservation heroes for the past several decades is honoring Kylie Paul. Kylie joined the staff of the Center for Large Landscape Conservation as a road ecologist earlier this year to advance the development and implementation of wildlife-friendly transportation policies and projects. But she has been making a positive impact on wildlife and ecosystems for many years.

By |2021-12-01T13:38:38-07:00November 29th, 2021|Corridors and Crossings, News and Updates, People|Comments Off on The Center’s Kylie Paul Wins Emerging Conservationist Award

2021 Annual Report: Celebrating 10 Years of Connecting People & Landscapes

We are pleased to announce the release of our 2021 Annual Report and are proud to share with you a few of our noteworthy accomplishments from the past year. From on-the-ground projects and cutting-edge research to our influence on state, national, and international conservation policy, these are efforts that you—our community of supporters—helped make possible. In addition, we celebrate the ways in which we have successfully connected people and landscapes in the last ten years since becoming an independent nonprofit organization.

By |2021-11-22T14:24:12-07:00November 22nd, 2021|News and Updates|Comments Off on 2021 Annual Report: Celebrating 10 Years of Connecting People & Landscapes

Beavers, Butterflies, and Climate Resilience: Indigenous-led Conservation Projects

The Center for Large Landscape Conservation recognizes and celebrates Native American Heritage Month. We value the relationships we have built with Tribal Nations and their many strengths as conservation partners, including their unique cultures, perspectives, knowledge systems, and governing structures. The modern conservation movement has much to learn from Native American Tribes, and we are pleased to share a few interesting and inspiring stories from 2021 of Indigenous-led conservation efforts.

By |2021-11-16T10:16:01-07:00November 15th, 2021|Climate Resilience, Community Resilience|Comments Off on Beavers, Butterflies, and Climate Resilience: Indigenous-led Conservation Projects

Bipartisan Infrastructure Package Provides Critical Funding to Reduce Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions

Marking an important step to safeguard both people and wildlife, the bipartisan infrastructure package that the U.S. Congress passed late Friday includes $350 million to construct wildlife road crossings. These structures reconnect important habitat and allow animals to pass safely over or under roadways, avoiding traffic. The legislation also makes projects to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions eligible for funding in other transportation programs. The provisions in this legislation will help safeguard biodiversity while stimulating the U.S. economy, mitigating climate impacts, and educing highway fatalities.

By |2021-11-06T10:18:21-06:00November 6th, 2021|Corridors and Crossings, Law, News and Updates, Policy|Comments Off on Bipartisan Infrastructure Package Provides Critical Funding to Reduce Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions

Center Completes USAID-funded Project to Advance Wildlife-Friendly Linear Infrastructure in Asia

Asia is home to many iconic wildlife species—such as Asian elephants, Bengal tigers, and Sumatran orangutans—along with some of the world’s richest biodiversity and most complex ecosystems. Yet, as Asia experiences unprecedented economic growth, the region’s natural heritage is threatened by the rapid expansion of linear infrastructure like roads, railways, and power lines. That’s why, over the last 14 months, the nonprofit Center for Large Landscape Conservation has helped USAID build a knowledge base to support Asian countries in planning wildlife-friendly linear infrastructure.

By |2021-10-25T08:45:22-06:00October 25th, 2021|Corridors and Crossings, International Connectivity, News and Updates, Research|Comments Off on Center Completes USAID-funded Project to Advance Wildlife-Friendly Linear Infrastructure in Asia

The Center Helps Set Global Conservation Agenda at IUCN Congress

Every four years, thousands of representatives from government, civil society, Indigenous peoples, business, and academia come together at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) World Conservation Congress with the goal of setting conservation priorities and driving actions. In light of challenges to convening, the postponed 2020 Congress was held with both in-person and virtual participants from September 3 to 11, 2021, in Marseille, France. As an official non-governmental organization (NGO) Member of the Union, the Center for Large Landscape Conservation contributed in multiple ways at the Congress toward setting the international conservation agenda for the coming decade.

By |2021-09-16T12:24:53-06:00September 16th, 2021|Corridors and Crossings, Events, International Connectivity, News and Updates|Comments Off on The Center Helps Set Global Conservation Agenda at IUCN Congress

2021 Catalyst Fund Grant Awards

The Network for Landscape Conservation has announced its 2021 Catalyst Fund grant awards, with 15 Landscape Conservation Partnerships from throughout the United States receiving support. Funds will be used to advance Partnerships’ efforts to protect the ecological, cultural, and community values of the landscapes they call home. Grants are made to Partnerships demonstrating a genuinely collaborative approach to conservation, involving a variety of stakeholders and often including historically marginalized communities who have been excluded from previous land-management decisions. In particular, a portion of the Fund is specifically dedicated to supporting Indigenous leadership in landscape conservation.

By |2021-09-16T10:20:34-06:00August 20th, 2021|Climate Resilience, Community Resilience, Mentorship, Networks We Host, News and Updates|Comments Off on 2021 Catalyst Fund Grant Awards

‘Rules of Thumb’ for Marine Connectivity Conservation Released Today

The ecological connectivity of marine and coastal ecosystems is essential. It requires linkages that connect our oceans' critical habitats, species, and natural processes. These connections allow a variety of species to move and they also sustain important ecosystem functions such as fish larvae dispersal, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestration—the ocean's ability to capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to slow climate change. To inform conservation efforts that maintain, enhance, and restore ecological connectivity of the oceans, a new publication was released today titled "Marine Connectivity Conservation ‘Rules of Thumb’ for MPA and MPA Network Design."

By |2021-12-06T15:19:01-07:00August 10th, 2021|Climate Resilience, International Connectivity, Science|Comments Off on ‘Rules of Thumb’ for Marine Connectivity Conservation Released Today

Citizen Scientists Collect Wildlife Data with Smartphone App

Roads can have many negative impacts on our natural world. Road ecologists study both the effects of roads on wildlife—such as roadkill and habitat fragmentation—and how to reduce these impacts. However, road ecologists can’t identify problem areas or develop solutions without a strong baseline of information on where and when animals attempt to cross roads or are struck by vehicles. Fortunately, new technology has created an opportunity for the public to help collect this data, and the Center is making this tool widely available.

By |2021-07-15T09:42:42-06:00July 15th, 2021|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Citizen Scientists Collect Wildlife Data with Smartphone App
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